RNLI Wells lifeboat volunteers rescue stranded crew from grounded yacht

Lifeboats News Release

Wells lifeboat crew were tasked by HM Coastguard at 10.28am on 17 August, to assist two people on board a 22-foot yacht which had run aground to the east of Wells Harbour.

RNLI Wells all-weather lifeboat heading out to the grounded yacht

RNLI/Ray West

RNLI Wells all-weather lifeboat heading out to the grounded yacht

The inshore lifeboat launched at 10.42am followed by the all-weather lifeboat at 10.44am and both proceed to the area of the casualties.

As the D-class lifeboat reached the location of the yacht at 10.49am and found the yacht hard aground on the sand.

At 11am the Mersey lifeboat, Doris E Mann, arrived on scene and stood off at sea while the inshore lifeboat assessed the situation. The helmsman of the D-class, together with the coxswain of the all-weather lifeboat, determined the best course of action for the safety of the two people on board. It was decided to take them off the yacht and bring them ashore.

At 11.15am the crew from the D-class lifeboat took the two crew from the yacht back to the safety of the lifeboat house, after successfully laying the yacht’s anchor out to the north to stop the yacht from moving any further into the sand.

At 11.16am the all-weather lifeboat was stood down and it too returned to the lifeboat station.

At 11.25am the inshore lifeboat safely landed the two casualties at the boathouse and passed them over to the Coastguard team who were in attendance. Neither casualty required medical treatment.

The inshore lifeboat was then rehoused and made ready for service.

At 11.39am the all-weather lifeboat came ashore and was rehoused and made ready for service.

Deputy Launching Authority, Greg Hewitt, said ‘As RNLI volunteers, the lifeboat crew understand that the safety of people is always the priority in every situation, above anything else. The decision to remove the two people from the yacht and take them back to the safety of the lifeboat house was absolutely the right one.'

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and, in a normal year, more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 143,000 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

About the author

For more information, please telephone Justine Sykes, RNLI Wells Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer on 07710510516

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.