Two volunteers successfully passed out as crew for Portsmouth RNLI

Lifeboats News Release

After months of training and many rigorous assessments, Portsmouth RNLI is celebrating double success as volunteers Jane and Josh pass out on both the Atlantic 85 and D-class inshore lifeboats

RNLI/Neil Maxwell

Jane, an Assistant Headteacher at a local secondary school and Josh, Operations Manager for Field Gun Sport completed their final assessments to ‘pass out’ as fully competent inshore lifeboat crew.

Josh, who is also Portsmouth RNLI's Boathouse Manager, highlighted the additional challenges faced because of COVID-19 whilst undertaking his training: 'The training I have received has been amazing with outstanding support from my fellow crew members. It certainly has been challenging training through the Covid period but I'm glad I can finally don the itchy jumper!' – a reference to the RNLI’s iconic navy blue Guernsey jumper awarded to passed out crew members at the Portsmouth station.

With almost 10 years of volunteering with the RNLI between them, Josh and Jane have dedicated countless hours to their training on the water, as well as helping with community events and fundraising for the charity so that Portsmouth RNLI can continue to save lives at sea on the south coast.

Neil Maxwell, Helm and Lifeboat Training Coordinator for Portsmouth Lifeboat Station said 'It’s fantastic to see Josh and Jane complete all their training and become substantive crew. Despite all the disruption that Covid caused to their training programmes, both Josh and Jane worked hard to make up for lost time and spent many hours training to achieve the required standard and become fully fledged members of the crew.

'Training and passing assessments is only one part of attaining the iconic blue Guernsey that is awarded to passed out crew members. To become part of the crew you are also expected to help others with training who are following in your footsteps and also help with fundraising - areas in which both Jane and Josh have excelled. They are exemplary figures and role models for those following the path as trainee crew and it is very rewarding for myself and other substantive crew who have watched and helped with their development to see them attain this goal.

I look forward to working with them in the future.'

Jane gave thanks to other station volunteers after her final assessments, saying 'I couldn’t have done it without the support and wisdom of all those at Portsmouth RNLI. I have learned and laughed a lot, and look forward to continuing my service to the station for many years to come.'


Notes to editors

Portsmouth Lifeboat Station has been providing search and rescue for the eastern Solent since 1965

For more information please contact Pippa Saunders, RNLI volunteer Deputy Lifeboat Press Officer on 07531 691452 or [email protected] or Miranda Dawson, RNLI volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer [email protected]. Alternatively contact the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336789

RNLI online: For more information, please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the RNLI News Centre.

Key facts about the RNLI:

Both the D-class and the Atlantic 85 are ‘inshore lifeboats’ operated by the RNLI. Inshore lifeboats (ILBs) usually operate closer to shore, in shallower water, near cliffs, rocks and even in caves. They are designed to be quick and manoeuvrable, allowing our crews to get as close as possible to those in trouble.

First introduced into the RNLI fleet in 1963, the design of the inflatable D class lifeboat continues to evolve to meet changes in demand and technology. She is highly manoeuvrable and usually operates closer to shore than our all-weather lifeboats. She comes into her own for searches and rescues in the surf, shallow water, and confined locations - often close to cliffs, among rocks and even inside caves

Portsmouth Lifeboat Station’s D-class is D-850 ‘The Dennis Faro’.

There are two types of B class lifeboat – the Atlantic 75 and the Atlantic 85 – named after Atlantic College in Wales where these rigid inflatable lifeboats (RIBs) were first developed. 75 and 85 represent the lengths of the lifeboats – nearly 7.5m and 8.5m respectively. Introduced into the fleet in 2005, the Atlantic 85 is the third generation of B class lifeboat and is gradually replacing the Atlantic 75.

Portsmouth Lifeboat Station’s A85 is B-846, ‘Norma T’.

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and, in a normal year, more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.