One afternoon, two multi-agency rescues for the volunteers at Queensferry RNLI

Lifeboats News Release

Queensferry RNLI worked alongside local Coastguard teams, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, SORT, Police Scotland, and flank station Kinghorn RNLI during two rescues on Tuesday 28 June.

Jimmie Cairncross RNLI Lifeboat and volunteers arrive on scene at Bo'Ness faced with mud

RNLI/Queensferry RNLI

Jimmie Cairncross RNLI Lifeboat and volunteers arrive on scene at Bo'Ness faced with mud

On 28 June at 11.25am, Queensferry RNLI were alerted to two persons and five dogs stuck in the mud up to their waists in the area close to Carriden slipway at Bo'Ness. This area becomes cut off by the tide which was coming in.

The Jimmie Cairncross Atlantic B-Class lifeboat made best speed to the scene. Unfortunately, the lifeboat was unable to reach the casualties due to lack of water at that time, so stood by as a safety vessel for the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service mud team who activated the rescue slide and recovered the casualties back to safety. Local UK Coastguard teams and SORT were also in attendance.

The RNLI lifeboat was immediately retasked to assist Kinghorn RNLI and the UK Coastguard Helicopter with the rescue of a person in the water at Burntisland at 12.40pm. The casualty was recovered onto the Kinghorn lifeboat where they made best speed to Burntisland Harbour. Volunteers from Queensferry RNLI assisted to bring the casualty safely ashore and proceed with casualty care until they could handover to the Scottish Ambulance Service. Also in attendance were local UK Coastguard teams, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, and Police Scotland.

Callum, volunteer Helm at Queensferry RNLI, said:

‘Yesterday [June 28] we were tasked to two multi-agency incidents along with our SAR partners. Upon arrival on scene at the first incident, the fire service had started to execute a rescue of two persons and five dogs stuck in the mud. As the tide was coming in, we stood by in the lifeboat to provide safety cover and add another option for extraction of the casualties if required.

‘During the second incident we supported our colleagues from Kinghorn RNLI lifeboat by providing casualty care. This specialist training provided by the institution, funded by our supporters, helped bridge the gap in prehospital care. All of our training is funded through donations from our supporters.

‘I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone for their continued support, especially those who attended our Open Day last weekend to help raise vital funds for the work we do.’

If you find yourself in an emergency situation or spot someone else in trouble, you should call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.

ENDS

Photo credit

The attached photo shows Queensferry RNLI lifeboat Jimmie Cairncross on scene at Bo’ness, with Scottish Fire and Rescue Service having deployed the slide for the rescue of the multiple persons and dogs stuck in the mud (28 June). Credit RNLI/Queensferry Lifeboat Station.

Notes to editors

Queensferry RNLI is based on the Hawes Pier, Queensferry EH30 9TB. The lifeboat station was founded in 1967 and the volunteer crew use an inshore Atlantic 85 B-Class lifeboat Jimmie Cairncross.

RNLI media contacts

Julie Dominguez, Lifeboat Press Officer, [email protected]

Natasha Bennett, RNLI Regional Media Officer for Scotland, 07826 900639, [email protected]

Martin Macnamara, RNLI Regional Media Manager for Scotland, 07920 365929, [email protected]

RNLI Press Office, 01202 336789

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

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