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Whitbys old lifeboat restoration is a step closer to completion.

Lifeboats News Release

Volunteers have spent over 360 hours working on the old rowing lifeboat and its carriage so far.

The old lifeboat, Robert and ellen Robson, is lowered onto the restored carriage at Coates Marine, Whitby.

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

The old lifeboat, Robert and ellen Robson, is lowered onto the restored carriage at Coates Marine, Whitby.
The 103 year old lifeboat, Robert and Ellen Robson which usually resides at the Whitby Lifeboat Museum was pulled by the crew back in September 2021 to a temporary home at Coates Marine in Whitby.

Here the old carriage, the only remaining one of its kind, and the wooden rowing lifeboat have been lovingly restored by a small team of volunteers for over 360 hours so far.

Curator of the museum Neil Williamson said: 'It has been painstaking but very rewarding working on the old lifeboat. The museum where she is usually housed is undergoing a major redevelopment at the moment, and the old rowing lifeboat will form the centrepiece of the exhibitions in what was the former lifeboat station.

The boat has a rich history of saving lives at sea in Whitby so it is very important that we keep this special piece of RNLI history maintained for the people of Whitby and visitors to the town to enjoy for years to come.'

The lifeboat was recently reunited with its carriage with help from the staff at the Coates Marine boatyard. Robert and Ellen Robson was hauled out of the shed and lifted back onto the carriage for the next step of the renovations, re-painting the old lifeboat.

Neil said: 'I would like to thank everyone who has helped us so far, the staff at Coates Marine have been extremely helpful. As well as the current RNLI volunteers who have lent a hand.'

Thanks also to Geoff Mackrill and Ed Betteridge at Teal & Mackrill Ltd of Hull for their kind support in the ongoing restoration of the Lifeboat and Carriage boat.

Tecmac have provided some of the paints used in the restoration so far and will continue to be doing so.'

For more information contact lifeboat press officer Ceri Oakes on 07813359428 or at [email protected].


Neil Williamson, Steven Upright and Richard Willis celebrate completing the carriage restoration with a mug of tea.

RNLI

Neil Williamson, Steven Upright and Richard Willis celebrate completing the carriage restoration with a mug of tea.
The fully restored carriage.

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

The fully restored carriage.
Robert and Ellen Robson is hauled out of the workshop to be lifted onto her carriage.

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

Robert and Ellen Robson is hauled out of the workshop to be lifted onto her carriage.
The restored carriage is pulled out of a shelter to be reunited with the lifeboat.

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

The restored carriage is pulled out of a shelter to be reunited with the lifeboat.
The old rowing lifeboat is carefully lifted into position.

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

The old rowing lifeboat is carefully lifted into position.

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

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