Howth RNLI name new ‘kid on the block’ at Howth Head conservation project

Lifeboats News Release

Volunteer lifeboat crew from Howth RNLI visited a farm on Howth Head this week to meet and officially name a new born kid goat as part of the conservation grazing project in the local area. The invitation was made by the Old Irish Goat Society.

The project has reintroduced Old Irish Goats to Howth after almost a century, to manage the growth of gorse in the local area resulting in reduced fire risk while also enhancing the biodiversity in the Dublin Bay UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

The Howth herd recently concluded its first breeding season, with fifteen kid goats born in March increasing the herd size to forty one. In recognition of the role the crew of Howth RNLI plays in the local community, the project coordinators invited the crew to name one of the new born kid goats.

Three volunteer crew members and the Howth Lifeboat Operations Manager visited the farm this week to meet the kid goat who has been named ‘Beaufort’.

Speaking following the visit to the farm, Howth RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, Colm Newport said: “The station was delighted to be asked by the project coordinators to name a goat in honour of the crew of Howth RNLI. This project, just like Howth RNLI plays a vital role in the local community to protect people. It aims to reduce the potential damage caused by gorse fires in the local area and enhance the biodiversity of the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in Howth.

“The crew chose the name ‘Beaufort’ for the kid goat as it represents an area within our patch in Dublin Bay – the Beaufort bank, and also the Beaufort scale, the standard scale for describing wind strength. Our crews train in all weather conditions so that once the pager sounds the crew can respond to save lives at sea.”

Melissa Jeuken, goat herder for the project said: “This project has reintroduced the Old Irish Goat to a habitat they inhabited nearly a century ago. The methods we are using help control the accumulation of gorse in the local area and is a more sustainable solution to managing this beautiful landscape. The fifteen recent additions to the herd, including ‘Beaufort’ brings the total herd size now to forty one. We hope to settle a group of goats on the east mountain in Howth this summer, and a further group on Ireland’s Eye, the island just north of Howth harbour at a later stage."

“The volunteer crew of Howth RNLI play a vital role for the local community and we wanted to recognise their dedication by inviting the crew to name one of the newborn kid goats who will hopefully go on to play a vital role for the sustainability of the local area for years to come."

“Beaufort is the son of the matriarch of the Howth Herd – Cailín. As such, he will take on a protective role for the herd as he grows up, just like Howth RNLI fulfils a protective role for the local community.”

ENDS

RNLI media contacts

For more information please contact Aidan Murphy, Local Press Officer, Howth RNLI Tel: 087 749 5983 email: [email protected] or Niamh Stephenson, Regional Media Manager on 0871254124 or [email protected]

Notes to Editors

Photo captions:
IMG2380 - Volunteer lifeboat crew Killian O'Reilly with Beaufort the goat

IMG2353 - Volunteer lifeboat crew Fin Goggin with Beaufort the goat

IMG2337 - Melissa Jeuken, goat herder brings Howth RNLI crew on a tour of the goat farm on Howth Head

Melissa Jeuken, goat herder brings Howth RNLI crew on a tour of the goat farm on Howth Head

RNLI/Howth

Melissa Jeuken, goat herder brings Howth RNLI crew on a tour of the goat farm on Howth Head

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The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

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