A busy Sunday afternoon for Looe RNLI volunteers

Lifeboats News Release

Looe RNLI volunteers responded to two shouts and two incidents within three hours this afternoon, Sunday 5 August 2018

Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith launching on the second shout

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith launching on the second shout

Our D Class crews towed in a broken down boat, offered safety advice to jet ski users and helped a kayaker who had fallen from his kayak. Shortly afterwards Looe RNLI’s Lifeboat Operations Manager rescued a person in difficulties attempting to swim across Looe river against a strong outgoing tidal current.

The first call to Looe RNLI volunteer crew came one minute past twelve this afternoon, 12.01 pm Sunday 5 August 2018, following a request for assistance from a boat suffering fuel problems drifting off Plaidy beach. Launching the charity’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith our crew quickly arrived on scene and established a line. The boat was towed back to her moorings above Looe bridge.

Just two hours later Devon and Cornwall Police were receiving multiple 999 calls reporting jet skis amongst swimmers at Millendreath. Falmouth Coastguards activated our crew pagers at 2.02 pm and the D Class Ollie Naismith launched eight minutes later and our crew headed over to the area. On arrival the volunteer crew offered strong safety advice to some of the jet ski users in the area.

Returning to the lifeboat station our crew spotted a kayaker in the water just off the Banjo Pier struggling to get back onto his kayak. Our crew helped him back onto his kayak and returned to the lifeboat station, where the inshore lifeboat was washed down refuelled and made ready for service at 2.45 pm.

Less than 15 minutes later a person attempting to swim across the river found himself in difficulties being swept down river in the strong outgoing tidal current. He was thrown a lifebelt with rope attached by a passing charter fishing boat Top Cat. From the ferry, Lifeboat Operations Manager Dave Haines and ferryman Dave Butters had spotted the incident unfolding and they immediately headed down river on Dave Haines’s boat Emma Louise, where they rescued the person from the river. With strong words of advice they took him safely back to the landing pontoon.

Commenting on the afternoon’s events Looe RNLI Helm Brian Bowdler said that these incidents could have quickly escalated into something more serious was it not for prompt action from the 999 callers. Jet skis and swimmers do not mix and care should always be taken when operating jet skis close to swimmers. Dave Haines goes on to say that people underestimate the strength of the tidal current and swimming in the river is prohibited by bye laws due to the dangers of commercial and pleasure boats operating in the area having restricted views and not being able to see them.

End

Notes to editors

Photos:

· 2 images - Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith launching on the second shout
Photo credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith assisting the kayaker
Photo credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· Looe RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Dave Haines and Dave Butters rescuing the swimmer
in Looe river
Photo credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· For further information on Looe RNLI Lifeboats please visit our website www.looelifeboats.co.uk

· Looe RNLI Facebook page www.facebook.com/LooeRNLI

RNLI media contacts

For more information please telephone Ian Foster, RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer for Looe Lifeboat Station, on 07902 753228 or looelpo@ianfoster.com or ian_foster@rnli.org.uk

or

Amy Caldwell, RNLI Regional Media Manager, on 07920 818807 or amy_caldwell@rnli.org.uk

or

Emma Haines, RNLI Regional Media Officer, on 07786 668847 or emma.haines@rnli.org.uk

Alternatively you can contact the RNLI Duty Press Officer on 01202 336789.

Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith assisting the kayaker

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith assisting the kayaker
Looe RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Dave Haines and Dave Butters rescuing the swimmer in Looe river

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Dave Haines and Dave Butters rescuing the swimmer in Looe river
Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith launching on the second shout

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI’s D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith launching on the second shout

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or or by email.

Categories