A quick change for Looe RNLI lifeboat crew to assist a cabin cruiser out of fuel

Lifeboats News Release

Volunteer crews from Looe RNLI launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat yesterday afternoon, Saturday 17 June 2017, following reports of a 16 foot cabin cruiser which had run out of fuel one mile south of Looe.

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II towing the cruiser by the Banjo Pier

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II towing the cruiser by the Banjo Pier

Unable to locate the cruiser the D Class inshore lifeboat was also launched to continue the search along the coastline whilst the Atlantic 85 searched further out into Looe bay. The cruiser with two occupants on board was located-some nine miles south east of Looe and towed back to the landing pontoon in Looe river by the Atlantic 85.

At 4.03 pm yesterday afternoon HM Coastguard Falmouth paged Looe RNLI volunteer crews after receiving a mobile phone call from a 16 foot cabin cruiser which had left Polperro earlier and had run out of fuel, they were unsure of their position thinking they were one mile south of Looe. Several of the volunteer crew were in the boathouse changing into dry clothes following the afternoon’s sailing when their pagers sounded. Quickly changing into their RNLI dry suits, lifejackets and helmets the charity’s Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II, was launched two minutes later at 4.05pm.

The Atlantic 85 made contact with the cruiser by mobile phone but was unable to locate the craft close to shore. A decision was made to launch the D Class inshore lifeboat Ollie Naismith at 4.52 pm to continue the search close to shore allowing the Atlantic 85 to search further out onto Looe bay. Around 5.30 pm the Atlantic 85 located the cruiser with two occupants onboard some nine miles south east of Looe. A tow line was established and the cruiser was towed back to the landing pontoon in Looe river by 6pm.

The lifeboats launched at low tide, weather was sunny and the sea was calm with light variable winds.

The Atlantic 85 and D Class inshore lifeboats returned to Looe Lifeboat Station where they were washed down and refuelled ready to go back on service at 6.30 pm.

Looe RNLI strongly recommend the use of a VHF Radio rather than relying on a mobile phone as mobile signals are unreliable out at sea. Lifeboats cannot home into the signal of a mobile phone but with a radio they can and will find you more quickly. Make sure your boat is sea worthy, check you have enough fuel for your planned journey, have suitable navigation aids and always wear lifejackets.

Atlantic 85 crew: Matthew Jaycock (helm), David Jackman, Ben Crabb and Aaron Rix

D Class crew: Clive Palfrey (helm), Richard Porter and Dan King

Shore crew Dave Haines, Nick Pope, Richard Rix, Graham Rich and Paul Barley

END

Notes to editors

· Picture -
Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II towing the cruiser by the Banjo Pier
credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· Picture -
Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II and D Class Ollie Naismith in Looe river with the cruiser

· credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· For further information on Looe RNLI Lifeboats please visit our website www.looelifeboats.co.uk

RNLI media contacts

For more information please telephone Ian Foster, RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer for Looe Lifeboat Station, on 07902 753228 or looelpo@ianfoster.com or ian_foster@rnli.org.uk

or

Amy Caldwell, RNLI Public Relations Manager, on 07920 818807 or amy_caldwell@rnli.org.uk

or

Carrie Garrad, RNLI Press Officer, on 07786 668847 or carrie_garrad@rnli.org.uk

Alternatively you can contact the RNLI Duty Press Officer on 01202 336789.

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II and D Class Ollie Naismith in Looe river with the cruiser

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II and D Class Ollie Naismith in Looe river with the cruiser

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

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The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland