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Whitby RNLI get set to make a splash this weekend

Lifeboats News Release

The annual flag weekend takes place this Saturday 5 and Sunday 6 August and there is an exciting new addition to this year's line up of events.

Barry Snedden and Goggy Wilson from local band the Vampire Prawns are just one of the acts set to play at Saturday's Party on the Pier

RNLI/Ceri Oakes

Barry Snedden and Goggy Wilson from local band the Vampire Prawns are just one of the acts set to play at Saturday's Party on the Pier

The first ever Party on the Pier will take place on Saturday night from 7pm at the bandstand with live bands, food and drink.

As well as the usual stalls and attractions on all day near the bandstand you will also get chance to 'dunk the lifeboat man' while raising vital funds for the charity.

The one-sheet challenge is not to be missed with participants testing their home-made boats in the harbour to try and win a cash prize. The challenge begins at 1pm on Saturday.

The highlight of the weekend will be the display on Sunday at 3pm in the harbour where you can see your local volunteers put the lifeboats through their paces and show off their training.

There will be collection buckets dotted around town and all funds raised go towards helping train and equip the life-saving crew.

The RNLI have recently released figures showing that this is the busiest time of year for incidents along the coast.

Last July and August, the charity’s lifeboat crews in the north of England launched their lifeboats in response to 321 emergencies (158 and 163 respectively), nearly one-third (31%) of their total call-outs for the year. Meanwhile, RNLI lifeguards in the region responded to 2,046 incidents on beaches during July and August (686 and 1,360 respectively), 79% of their total annual incidents.

The RNLI’s national drowning prevention campaign, Respect the Water, is part of the charity’s work to halve coastal drownings by 2024. The theme of the campaign is: ‘Fight your instincts, not the water.’ It reminds people of the risks but, most importantly, provides them with the skills to survive for longer if they unexpectedly find themselves in water, and the knowledge of what to do should they see someone else in danger. The RNLI is asking people to visit RNLI.org/RespectTheWaterwhere they will find safety advice. On social media search #RespectTheWater.

For more information contact Lifeboat Press Officer Ceri Oakes on 07813359428 or at ceri_oakes@hotmail.com

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen, Carrybridge and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland

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