Llandudno Lifeboat Station project

With an improved lifeboat station, in a better location and a faster boat, the Llandudno community will be safer than ever before.
Station projects Llandudno
Computer-generated image of the new Llandudno Lifeboat Station on Llandudno Promenade

What’s needed:

A new Shannon class lifeboat station

For:

Llandudno Lifeboat Station

When

Planned for completion in 2016

Here’s why…

For over 150 years, generations of local volunteer lifeboat crews from Llandudno have been tirelessly saving lives at sea, as well as inland during flooding.

Today, our Llandudno volunteer crew operate an inshore D class lifeboat called William Robert Saunderson D-656 and an all-weather Mersey class lifeboat called Andy Pearce 12-006.

But their current lifeboat station is in the centre of town. So each time they’re paged to launch, they have to drive either one or both lifeboats on a trailer through town to reach the sea. It’s a lengthy, impractical process that brings the town to a standstill.

And if someone is in trouble in the water, the crew know that just seconds can make all the difference between life and death.

Llandudno RNLI’s Mersey class lifeboat, Andy Pearce 12-006, being pulled by tractor through the streets of the town for launch

Photo: Nigel Millard

Llandudno RNLI’s Mersey class lifeboat, Andy Pearce 12-006, being pulled by tractor through the streets of the town for launch.

Making way for the Shannon

Built in 1904, the station’s boathouse has been extended over the years to accommodate larger replacement lifeboats. But it has now reached a stage where no further extensions can be made.

With the station’s much-loved Mersey approaching the end of her operational lifetime, a new boathouse will be needed to accommodate her replacement – our revolutionary new Shannon class all-weather lifeboat – which the crew are highly excited about.

Designed entirely in-house by our naval architects, the Shannon is the first modern all-weather lifeboat powered by waterjets rather than propellers. This means she can operate in shallow waters and be launched and recovered from the beach.

The Shannon will also improve safety for our lifeboat volunteers thanks to her shock absorbing seats and on-board computer system, which allows the crew to operate and monitor the lifeboat from the safety of their seats.

Out with the old and in with the new

Being an old, traditional building, the current lifeboat station provides little comfort for the crew.

They have a narrow landing on which to change into their kit. There is nowhere to wash and relax after a tiring rescue. And the crew training room is so small that half of them have to sit on the floor.

A new lifeboat station located on Llandudno Promenade at a location much closer to the sea will resolve all of these issues.

And with an improved lifeboat station, in a better location and a faster boat, the Llandudno community will be safer than ever before.

What a new station means to the crew and community

Llandudno RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat crew lined up on the beach in full kit.

Photo: RNLI/Nigel Millard

Llandudno RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat crew lined up on the beach in full kit.

The 60-strong team of RNLI volunteers at Llandudno including station officers, lifeboat crew, guild members and shop assistants are absolutely delighted with this news.  The new RNLI lifeboat station will house the station’s new 25-knot Shannon class all-weather lifeboat and D class inshore lifeboat together with their launching equipment and include modern facilities for the crew. And it will enable the RNLI to continue providing an efficient lifesaving service to mariners and those using the local waters and coastline for many years to com]

Matt Crofts
RNLI Lifesaving Delivery Manager for north and north-west Wales

How you can help

With 94% of our total income coming from generous donations and legacies, we depend on our dedicated volunteers and supporters to continue saving lives at sea.

The fundraising never stops. Our lifeboat crews have a team of fundraising volunteers behind them, all working tirelessly to raise essential lifesaving funds for their stations and lifeboats to keep their communities as safe as possible.

If you’d like to support them and help fund our search and rescue service, including lifeboat station projects such as this one, please donate today.